Clearing The Emotional Wall To Find Truth

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A blog I follow, DeceptionUnraveled posted to their FB page recently the following…

Emotions can run high when it challenges our beliefs. Galileo was charged as a heretic and Bruno was killed for his belief that the earth rotated around the sun. However, that did not change the fact that it was truth. Ever more so with Christianity. A dear friends husband used to say “you have to get over that emotional wall”. I am learning, especially from Rabbi Skobac, I need to change my way of thinking when talking with Christians. For instance, instead of asking show me where Jesus in the Tanak, I should ask questions like show me in plain scriptures where in the Tanak it describes what the Messiah is supposed to do.

 

So this got me thinking about two things…

The first is…

Many people think they stand for truth, when they merely stand for a religious or political position. When people make defending a religion, a political party, a fill-in-the-blank, more important than the truth the resulting fruit serves to promote defensiveness, the propagation of lies, setting roots for power and control, which ultimately leads to wars – big and small and ultimately all manner of crimes committed often in the name of one’s religion.

The second is…

What is my goal in discussing with others about their religious, political or other beliefs?

1. As DeceptionUnraveled pointed out, using phrases like “show me in plain scripture … what Messiah is suppose to do?” puts the onus of providing the burden of proof on the other person. This will promote all willing parties in the discussion to stay focused on the facts, the scripture – as it is plainly stated.

2. Is the goal to “win” or to “prove my point”?  It’s easy to get on the defensive when emotions run high. Seems like human nature to want to be right. But Tanakh teaches us humility and has many proverbs that teach us to use our tongues with intentionality because the power of life and death is in the tongue and it can be a fountain of life to those who we speak wisely to.

3. Emotions are deceptive. Recognizing and getting a hold of my emotions will always serve me well as I strive to serve YHVH. If I can recognize my emotions, especially frustration or defensiveness I can internally make an adjustment and reframe my inner thoughts to “what is important about this conversation? What is the goal of my communication?”

These are just a few quick ramblings for what they are worth…but here is something always worth remembering…

Truth is found on the other side of the emotional wall.

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